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(instrumental music) >> for 63 years the u.s. has been part of the nato alliance, but is nato still an important safeguard for americans or is it simply a money pit? >> the nato relationship is enormously important to us. i think it was winston churchill said something to the affect that the only worst thing than, than going to war with allies is to go to war without allies. >> we're dealing with network global threats and if we don't provide a network global response we're always gonna to be on the back foot. >> what we need is not just nato on the conventional defense side, we need a nato alliance for economic statecraft. >> the problem is that it is an alliance that is largely sustained by american defense spending. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society f
from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions is provided by credit suisse, eni, the hurford foundation, and pricewaterhousecoopers llp. >> coming up next, the intervention calculation. (instrumental music) >> historically the u.s. leaned heavily on strategic interventions to help counter the influence of communism. >> the reagan doctrine was a notion that we would support those that sought to oppose soviet domination. >> during the cold war there was a polarized world - there was the soviet union, there was the united states and a lot of our interventions were used to block the advance of communism, and so very ideological basis for our, our interventions. >> and the u.s. has long retained the power to intervene at will. >> the united states has the capability, military capability, the power, literally the sort of capability to get things done. in
are paying them. i can't believe we can't use the marines in these situations. someone has got to do a cost benefit analysis. can you imagine the amount of money we have spent fooling around with these contractors that weren't getting the job done? can you imagine the time we have spent on this and the money that has been spent? i would like for you, general, to talk about the cost benefit of putting marines in our embassies and why in the world this is hard for us to get our arms around and where is the analysis that shows us we are saving any money. >> just to react briefly to what would be necessarily a much longer conversation. the marines are not -- that's not their role or what they do for the nation. could it be at some point potentially? i would hate to think we would make that decision based on costs but it would require a longer conversation. >> i guess my point is god forbid we have something happen in kabul. this would look like child's play if you look at the history of what's gone on in terms of the guard force at kabul. and you know, i want to be to rt would be necessarily a
used to talk about the philosopher kings. geeks have no interest in power. the only power we're interested in is low-power consumption and longer battery life and low prices so we can stay up later at night. geeks may inherit the earth, but they have no desire to rule it. >> in a poll reported by harris interactive in december of 2010, 45% of the people surveyed said that they would rather do household chores than to try and fix their computer or digital devices on their own. in the electronic age, it continues to be good to be a geek. that's this edition of 60 minutes on cnbc. i'm steve kroft. thank you for joining us. captioning by captionmax www.captionmax.com [ticking] >> even though there's a total embargo in this country against any trade with iran, iran still gets high tech materials and components for a variety of weapons from right here in the u.s.a. this man set up a trading company in philadelphia. you are charged with trying to buy a centrifuge that could be used to make biological weapons, like anthrax. >> yes. that's what they say. >> do you know how much money
-japanese protests started causing a protest of japanese protests and those who use them. and the protests are so bad that a chinese man made the simple mistake of driving a japanese car in a chai neads city of chian and was beat sewn badly he is paralyzed. this week, a chinese minister accused a japanese vessel of target i targeting the radar on a japanese ship off of the islands, but the chinese officials are disputing it happened. now think about this, the world's second and the third largest economies playing chicken in the pacific over a dispute of uninhabited islands, but if this diplomatic disagreement were to escalate into a military obligation, the united states would be obligated by the 52-year-old treaty obligation to help the sovereignty of japan, and does that mean that north korea would come to the aid of china, but it is a quaint and admittedly alarmist experiment, because that is not how foreign wars are conducted anymore. next month marks the 10-year invasion of iraq, and the last conflict that we can think of conventional war that claimed the lives of more than 4,000 americans and b
used was one of the best we had ever encountered. >> so mr. al-awlaki is by not an american citizen by where anyone in america would be proud? >> he was part of al qaeda, and it was his determination to kill americans on behalf of al qaeda. >> thank you. is it true that in the last four years the fbi has arrested 100 people, either planning, conspiring, or trying to commit a terrorist attack on this nation? >> yes, they have arrested a lot of people. >> that is because of good, sound intelligence. i think what people forget is that they will kill us if they can and it is extraordinarily difficult if you cannot get into where they were hiding. would it have been possible to have arrested mr. al-awlaki where he was in the yemen? >> we work very closely with yemenis to see if we can arrest individuals. if we can, we want to do that because it is valuable for us. any actions taken in concert with the yemeni government are done in terms of any types of strikes we might engage there with them, are done only because we do not have the ability to bring those individuals into custody. >> tha
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without the collaboration of the committee of the colleagues in order to do that in 2013, and example of the
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
of the subcommittee. i am looking forward to working with the ranking members as we both share a commitment to u.s. border security and ensuring our board agents -- ensuring our border agents receive the support they need to protect homeland. also look forward to a strong bipartisan cooperation in helping to make the department of home as security as efficient and effective as possible. i would also like to introduce our new freshmen majority members. we have mr. richard hudson of north carolina. later joining us will be stephen from montana. they bring a welcome experience to their new roles in congress and the subcommittee. i look for to leveraging their experience and knowledge to provide effective oversight of hds. -- of dhs. i think the subcommittee staffer diligently working together to put this hearing together. thank you for that. i now recognize myself for an opening statement. next month marks 10 years since the creation of the dhs with the homeless security act of 2001. the attacks on september 11 forced to rethink our approach to defining the homeland. as the commission report document
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
york times" on syria and whether the president may be reconsidering the use of american weapons supplied to the rebels. the concern president obama had lying weapons would in effect be involved in a proxy war supported by iran and russia. the other side of the debate is nothing else is working and we need to create pressure on assad and build relationship with people inside syria who might take over one day. another factor is there are rebels, al-qaeda affiliated rebels the united states and the west doesn't support. and i don't think it's in the west's interest to see them end up at the top of the heap. >> rose: and then we turn to the story of the chinese army spying on the american government and american companies with david sanger of the "new york times," dune lawrence and michael riley of bloomberg businessweek. >> the cyber has been off to the side as something of an annoyance. i'm hearing this has gotten so big it's moving to the center of the relationship and it risks the rest of the relationship. i think the next thing you're going to see the president sending some ki
is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from inside that country. what the afghan people fear might happen when u.s. forces leave. >>> plus, lights out at the super bowl. did you catch this? a power outage putting the big game on hold for more than a half an hour. what was the behind the blackout? jenna: let's not jinx anything. we need our lights. jon: we do. it is all "happening now." jon: first up today, that terrifying hostage situation in alabama now in its 7th day. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: what a story. good morning everybody, i'm jenna lee. drones are now flying over that underground bunker where police say jimmy lee dykes is holding a 5-year-old boy
heightened security risk. and i think it's time for us to do a check on whether or not we should in fact be relying on in that local militia were contractors. >> senator, let me just commend you for the work you've been doing with regards to these kind of contract and the quality of individuals that are involved. .. to do what is inherit a government function. it's almost like a hit brick wall every i time talk about this. why is it it has to be a contract function. why can't we use the best trained military in the world to protect our most valued assets in our most dangerous places? >> i mean, i think the reality just speaking with regards to my old agency we are deployed in so many areas you can't expect the military to pop up there and provide that kind of protection. they have to get security on side and get from the very best people they can contract with. that's become the reality we're dealing with. >> because the need to integrate to the community and therefore if you have military it stands out. i can see that particularly under the intelligence agency. for embassies, it
. and that is why it is so important for us to do the report that we did. i will give you a perfect example. you have loan officers at banks being paid bonuses and pay based on how many loans they created. not whether those were good loans. not taking into account whether the loans would later default and caused sick of it and losses. there were a number of different causes of the financial crisis. we tried to bring a lot of transparency to it, to report on that. we are also doing a lot of work in this area to say what has not been dealt with. you are exactly right, fannie and freddie is not dealt with under dodd-frank. but let's talk about dodd-frank for a moment. there have been reforms to our financial system, but there needs to be significantly more. one thing about dodd-frank is it sets up a framework. but ultimately not all of the rules are implemented. there are very important standards that need to be set by the regulators and treasury. because what we are worried about is trying to protect americans in the event of another financial crisis. we do not want to be in a situation where one
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
reconstruction, john sopko delivered a report on you for spending so far show in the u.s. government spent over $7 million on a largely unused building. his remarks from the center for strategic and international studies in washington d.c. rfid the minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. thanks for coming today. my name name is robert laman and director of the program in crisis conflict and cooperation here at csis. welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sopko who is the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction known by the acronym sigar. mr. sopko has been a state and federal prosecutor. he has been congressional counsel, senior federal government adviser. he has been the chief counsel for oversight and investigation for the house committee on energy and commerce and has also been on the chief oversight counsel for homeland security. and under then senator sam nunn, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation staff. he has worked at commerce at the justice department, at the state and federal level and today he is the special inspector general f
are a citizen of the united states, you have become the enemy. i do not see anything wrong with using drone strikes to take them out. i just do not they have done a good job, i believe. host: what do you think? you should be in charge of the program and targeting american citizens? -- who should be in charge? caller: i do not believe it should be the department of defense. understanding there are several 1r ectives, one being 5240- there is the required targeting of citizens, targeted hits for certifications of these drawings. some are purchased by organizations and various agencies. they are hitting civilians whether it is just electromagnetic or i pray that they are not killing innocent citizens. this is a question here. 30,000 additional drones to be released, tested, and evaluated over the united states? i think america needs to wake up. 30,000 additional draws while we have homelessness, veterans returning, you can put that kind of money over the united states of america. there are too many directives out there and contractors who are now using these devices targeting citizens as we si
you think congress should consider a proposal and vote? be prepared to tell us why or why not. here are the numbers. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. you can always send us e-mail. "the chicago tribune" picked up the story, talking about a wide range of issues. gun violence is the main topic of the speech. the reporter says -- part of the speeches today look to congress and what they should do. here is what he had to say. gu[video clip] >> ivory -- i recognize not everybody has to agree with our issues. different from upstate and downstate illinois. these proposals deserve a vote in congress. they deserve a vote. [applause] and i want to thank those members of congress who are working together in a serious way to try to address this issue. host: playing off of that repeated phrase, that is the question we propose to you, whether you think they deserve a vote. whether you do or don't, you could call on the lines that represent you. we have put this on twitter as well. facebook 2. we had about 20 responses when we first started the program. here are a couple o
reaction from inside that country. what the afghan people fear might happen when u.s. forces leave. >>> plus, lights out at the super bowl. did you catch this? a power outage putting the big game on hold for more than a half an hour. what was the behind the blackout? jenna: let's not jinx anything. we need our lights. jon: we do. it is all "happening now." jon: first up today, that terrifying hostage situation in alabama now in its 7th day. good morning to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: what a story. good morning everybody, i'm jenna lee. drones are now flying over that underground bunker where police say jimmy lee dykes is holding a 5-year-old boy hostage. the boy has asperger's syndrome and is said to be as comfortable as possible. it all began when the suspect allegedly boarded a school bus, demanding hostages. police say he shot the driver when the driver tried to intervene. that driver, charles poland, was laid to rest this weekend. investigators say besides careful negotiations, dykes is showing very few signs that he is willing to end the standoff. elizabeth prann is live in mid
the memories of their fallen brothers, and to help us to remember why this country remains strong and free. how so few americans prevailed against so many, as to prepare for the citation, i will leave you with the words of clinton himself. because they say something about the army and something about america. they say something about our spirit, which will never be broken. "we were not going to be beaten that day. we will not back down in the face of diversity like that -- adversity like that. we're just going to win, plain and simple." god bless you, clinton romesha, and all of your team. god bless all who serve, and god bless the united states of america. with that, i would like the citation to be ready. >> the president of the united states of america, authorized by act of congress, march 3, 1963, has awarded in the name of congress the medal of honor to staff sergeant clinton romesha, u.s. army, force -- for conspicuous gallantry and intricately above and beyond the call of duty. clinton romesha this in which and self at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving i
to say a word about the councils africa center for the benefit of the audience, those who are new to us were joining us for the first time via television or the internet. the africa center was established in september, 2009, with a mission to help transform u.s. and other healthy approaches to africa by emphasizing the building of strong geopolitical partnerships with african states and strengthening economic growth and prosperity on the continent. the center seeks to engage and inform with policymakers in the general public of the strategic importance of effort that. both globally and for american and european interest in particular. a subject which obviously -- a commitment you share by joining us today. of strategic importance. we do this for -- a robust media presence. we worked promote constructive us leadership and engagement in international affairs is done the central role of the atlantic community in meeting international challenges. the africa center supports and collaborates with product -- public and private sectors, giving practical solutions to the challenges in africa. on
will use super bowl sunday to talk about government regulations when it comes to the issue of steroids or head injuries. the phone lines are open. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines courtesy of the museum. from "the san francisco chronicle" -- from "the baltimore sun" -- let's turn to the politics and policy behind the nfl. this is a story a few days ago from "the washington post." outlining a plan and a letter to the executive director of the players union. they agreed as part of a 2011 collective bargaining agreement that the players should be tested for hgh, but the two sides of that agreed. two seasons have been played without it. last weekend in new orleans, roger goodell was asked a number of questions including one on the issue of head injuries. here is more from last week. [video clip] >> i welcome the president's comments. we want to make sure people understand what we are doing to make our game safer, not just in the nfl but throughout sports. the changes we are making a in the nfl are changing all of sports. it is a better recognition of head injuries. of treat
, everybody. >> funny. >> welcome to "morning joe." it's tuesday, february 5th. with us senior political analyst mark halperin. >> i was going to do a three thumb fight but willie wasn't up for it. >> i'll beat you that on any day. msnbc analyst and visiting professor harold ford junior. >> good morning. >> it was funny stuff last night. >> it was funny except it's not fun funny. i guess he had to address all of david letterman's jokes. i interviewed chris christie for my book coming up in may very seriously about his weight and about how much those jokes hurt him. i guess he felt he had to do that to sort of, you know, break the ice with letterman. >> what do you mean those jokes hurt him? >> they hurt his feelings. >> i want to see another clip and see how hurt he is? he handles it very well. >> do you have family members who are also heavy? >> no. i'm the guy. >> you are the guy. >> i'm the guy. >> how is your health sxwlmpt if you went to a doctor today, what would the doctor say? >> startlingly good. >> how is your cholesterol? >> my cholesterol is normal, believe it or not. >> that
's different? we have seen an enormous increase in the u.s. trade deficit, especially with countries like china. today, they happened to release a report that looked at the effect of currency manipulation, perhaps the single most important factor and explain the growth of our trade deficit. eliminating the trade deficit or eliminating currency manipulation could reduce the trade as a by roughly $190-$490 billion. doing this would increase manufacturing employment by up to 1 million jobs. that's a big downpayments in the whole we have created in manufacturing and employment. one thing we need to do is create demand. that is what we did do but we did not do that in the last decade. we need to shift the demand to domestic produced goods resulting in the hiring of domestic workers. manufacturing jobs are amongst the best for workers especially for those without a college degree. high wages, good benefits. >> bruce, you worked in washington, d.c., and brookings is right off dupont. >> i am mostly on a plane. >> industrial policy is a dirty word. if you go to any other domestic place, it will land yo
that. but in any event, it's the group using the one and half million cell phones but it's the group watching the south korean soap operas but it's the group that is becoming the information consumers of north korea who are desperate for more information or salivating, the chairman of google was visiting because they are thinking that the opportunities for their closed system internet. and then there's all the north koreans a sickly, the rest of north korea, most of north korea, where just puncturing the bubble of censure, of censorship that exist in north korea with what north korea really spends on defense, what it spends on its missile programs. i've always equated it to the lesson of development including the local aid budget upon the village schoolhouse door so villagers would know if the village elders were stealing the money. that was intended for the schoolhouse. i think we can through basic information in this age that more and more north koreans know about the human rights record. north korean database that's now a permanent growing database now, five, six years running bec
>> let's talk about recent comments in canada, the u.s. ambassador to canada and find that more action by canada on climate change might make it easier for the president to approve keystone. how did you interpret those comments? >> i think it was another opportunity to talk about what we are doing. i believe for the president and for canada, it is both. you can actually improve energy security and in our neighborhood of north america and with vehicle emissions standards, coal plants standards, you will eventually see that in the united states. nobody is replacing a coal plant with coal again. they are replacing it with natural gas. it reduces emissions by 50%. i did not see that as a quid pro quo. when the secretary of state and our minister of foreign affairs met and had a press conference, they talked about both climate change and energy security. we talked about vehicle emissions standards. th minister talked about the action we've taken had the the united states on coal plants in canada. i closed down some coal plants. i thought it was good for our jurisdiction but i think e
must end this uncertainty about this position. mr. president, it is time for us to end this debate. and that is what we will be voting on now. later on, there will be a vote on whether to confirm senator hagel. the vote now is whether to bring this debate to an end. i hope we will so we can get on to the nomination vote. i yield the floor. i think it's noon and time for a vote. the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. the senator from oklahoma has 30 seconds remaining. the senator from oklahoma. mr. inhofe: let me say that we -- everything has been said, not everyone has said it. however, i would like to make sure that everyone understands that the actual statements that were made by the former senator hagel in terms of the relationship of our country with israel and iran prior to the time that he was nominated, because many of those statements were changed at that time. i encourage the no vote on cloture. the presiding officer: the time is expired. under the previous order, the clerk will report the motion to invoke cloture. the clerk: cloture motion, we the undersig
's it for us. thanks for watching. "erin burnett out front" starts now. >> a suicide bomber stages a deadly strike on an american embassy and this time the white house quick to label it a terrorist attack. >>> plus, a prosecutor gunned down on the way to work. friend says he believes he was in serious danger. was it revenge for doing his job? >>> and guns and politics. did joe biden slip of the tongue just wreck the president's message on guns? let's go out front. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. american embassy attacked. a suicide bomber struck at a security checkpoint at the american embassy in turkey today, and this time the white house immediately labeled it an act of terror. >> a suicide bombing on the perimeter of an embassy is by definition an act of terror, a terrorist attack. however, we do not know at this point who is responsible or the motivations behind the attack. the attack itself is clearly an act of terror. >> an act of terror regardless of who is responsible or what their motivations are. more on that in a moment, but first, chris lawrence at the pentagon. ch
out of it and we don't solve any problem and gave politics are just as bad for us in the next 10 years. >> quite frankly don't trust congress so if congress can't make the contracts, the first thing that will come down is who will be high-skilled or -- if the was enforcement only and they said oh yeah by the way we are definitely going to do a low-skilled thing of future and do high-skilled i wouldn't support the enforcement only because i don't trust them. i think they will stop after stop after that about this over the last couple of years when they did these peaceful approach is a lot of them failed. the immigration act that moved the countries of origin toward a green card, greenlaw stopped in the house. had stopped after it passed in the house. unfortunately there is a political strategy going on now. i personally think it only matters if it's if it's a road to an and i think that's always going the way it's going now. >> without, thank you all for coming. there will be orders for drinks in the lobbies if you want to come back. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conve
armed service committee. this should begin in a second. let us watch. we will cavill and to hear from defense secretary leon panetta and general martin dempsey about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi that resulted in the death of four americans. one week ago today, this committee heard from senator chuck hegel -- hagel to be the next defense secretary. the center of south carolina said he would put a hold on former senator hagel's nomination unless leon panetta agreed to testify. this is the first of two harris we will show you today. this and later this afternoon, the confirmation hearing for cia director nominee, john brennan, currently the counter-terrorism chief. >> good morning, everybody. we welcome secretary of defense leon panetta and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff general martin dempsey to testify about the department of defense's response to the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya on september 11 and all of last year. the findings of its review following that attack, including lessons learned. i want to remi
government is tied to a large number of cyber attacks on the u.s.. if the administration released a report that it will consider fines and other trade actions against china or any other country guilty of cyber espionage. we will continue to follow that story and bring you any remarks that may come out from administration officials today. the supreme court is expected to hear arguments in late march in two prominent cases that could test the bounds of laws restricting gay marriage. authors of "recently released book some day marriage recently debated the issue at harvard university. it is and about how to by the federalist society at harvard. this is one hour. >> thank you. richard fallon is the junior professor of constitutional law at harvard law school. he also earned a ba degree from oxford university, where he was a rhodes scholar. he served as a law clerk to justices of the united states supreme court and has written extensively about constitutional and federal courts law. he is the author of several books. we are very grateful for him for participating. andrew koppelman is the john p
us at twitter.com/booktv. >> you're watching booktv. next, jeffrey engel talks about his book, "into the desert," a collection of essays by journalists, government officials, and scholars that look back on the events in the impact of the 1990-91 gulf war. it's about an hour 20 your. >> doctor jeffrey engel is the founding director of the presidential history project at southern methodist university, until the summer of 2012, he served as the class of 52 a.m., professor at texas a&m university in the bush school. so we are pleased there here as well. that you very much for the support you've given to jeffrey engel and to the bush school in texas and them. when jeff was in texas a&m county was the dreck of programming for the institute and is a graduate of cornell university. additionally, studied at saint catherine's college, oxford university, and received his ph.d in american history from university of wisconsin at madison. he served as an postdoctoral fellow in international security studies at yale university. his books include "cold war at 30,000 feet,." he received a pretty sign
political parties and civic groups because at least in theory parties are more accountable and tend to use their money to help challenges and are less inclined to support extremist, which is no small matter in today's polarized environment. here we go. thank you. here are some trends i see and how citizen as united plays into them. it did not cause them but it greases the wheels, especially since 2000 to when congress passed the bi-partisan campaign reform act. there is a redistribution of money away from can't attend -- candidates and toward groups. candidates are chiefly responsible but more is spent by others and for a while was political parties but it is non-party groups and citizens united cracked up this dynamic. -- ratches up this dynamic. there are strong incentives for collective action by partisans. national politics today is about high-stakes elections. both parties have a chance to control government and have very different views about what should be done. because of this, parses want to organize and coordinate but campaign finance laws but restraint of that. the laws were de
using putting more and more on the backs of individuals. we've heard story after story this morning where there is irrational use in the delivery system because of the fragmentation that we have and we have seen through the payment reform that we have done that setting the right payment incentives in place actually does help rationalize the system and start to net the fabric together between the primary care and specialty care and we actually have hospitals that start to understand what their place in the reform system is there a cost center not a revenue center and they have to actually become smaller over time for the system to become sustainable, so to me, you know, to focus our attention on the individuals in the public and beneficiaries and how we are right to change their benefits to make all of this work seems like a full of air and when the real problem is the way that we have structured the incentive on the delivery system side and fixing that we can get a long range towards addressing affordability and quality. >> we have time for a question or two from the audience. if yo
"commitment to the values that define us as americans." others note his impeccable integrity and his dedication to the country is second to none. without unanimous consent, i would like to insert into the record matters the committee has received in regard to brennan's nomination. john brennan by all accounts will be a strong leader, guided firmly by the law and his strong ethical code. he has assured the committee in his response to pre-hearing questions that he will be independent from political influence. he will seek only to provide the president, the congress, and other leaders with his best analysis and advice. his responses to the committee's questions are available on the committee's website. intelligence.senate.gov. of course the committee must conduct its due diligence on such an important nominee, some members are going to have questions in a range of topics, including his plans for directing the agency, major national security challenges we face, positions and actions he has taken in his current and past jobs. also of interest will be mr. brennan's the view on the use of
quite cranky with us for saying it but how about that? you can't say anything about iraq. he never saw iraq. it happened 30 years after he was gone. >> now i would like to add with what you began the book with which is in this most recent election in iran that when there was considerable consternation about how the election went, the state aired the lord of the rings in an effort to pacify people but he didn't have that effect. what happened to? >> the tremendous irony is that while the state, the ahmadinejad regime says they don't get many western movies. these movies are hotter than the sun and everybody is watching them. of course years after they came out of the west, they came out in early 2000 it was 2009, here is the irony. the seikh pokes the movies out there that they should have had some of their own people watch them very carefully. what the movies do, when the movies are about ursula freedom they argue in favor of democracy and on as practices and fair treatment as in a combination of injustice, they would hardly be something you would show people to try to calm them down.
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